DIY Mosaic Resin Lamp

My mom recently gave me this rusty, dirty lamp that had been sitting in her garage for years. During its hay day, it was displayed prominently in my mother’s living room. But, 10 years ago, it was displaced to the garage after a move into a bigger house. Rust, spiders, and other pests have had their way with it and now it’s my turn to breathe new life into this antique metal lamp.

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Luckily, it still works and all the pieces are still in tact. So, with an idea in the back of my head, I purchased spray paint, mosaic tiles, and resin. Then I got to work.

First I needed to scrub off the layers of dust and sand the peeling paint. It was pretty nasty but it took no time to clean up.

IMG_8514 IMG_8520 IMG_8521I chose white spray paint with a hint of blue for a fresh new look. To start, I taped off the cord, the switch, and the entire top then began painting in my backyard. It’s best to use a well ventilated area and to paint on a warm but not hot day (60-70 degrees is best).

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I applied two coats of paint and waited approximately an hour for it to dry to the touch.

IMG_8695Once it dried, I had big plans for the tray in the middle of the lamp. Last year, I made a DIY Mosaic Table that I absolutely love. And I’m not the only one, that project is pinned almost everyday on my Pinterest. For this particular project, I wanted to try a new technique by using Clear Casting Resin.

IMG_8711I picked up my resin at Hobby Lobby. It was a bit pricy at $25 but I had a gift certificate (Thanks Leah!) in that exact amount so I decided it was meant to be. I also picked up some colorful mosaic tile because my Mosaic Table decimated my tile supply. With no specific arrangement in mind, I simply tossed them into the tray and arranged the colors evenly.

IMG_8705Then I followed the instructions on the back of the resin. The resin is mixed with a catalyst  to start a chemical reaction and ultimately harden. The proportions are very important so take your time reading through the instructions before beginning your project. If you are making a very precise project, I would recommend gluing your tile down before pouring the resin. Since my project did not need to be precise, I skipped this step.

IMG_8712 IMG_8713In order for the resin to harden, it needs to be in a room that is at least 70 degrees. It was in the 50’s here last week so I completed the project in my house. Let me tell you, this was my biggest mistake. My house smelled like chemicals for days! No air fresheners, perfumes, or candles could get rid of it.

IMG_8719And it takes a LLLLOOOOONNNNGGGG time to dry. But it was worth it in the end and I love my finished product!

IMG_8740My new lamp found its new home in our bedroom. David has never had a lamp or table on his side of the bed and this lovely lamp fits the bill for both of those requirements! I chose to use colorful tiles because I recently got a new bedspread for our bed. I found this gorgeous duvet at JC Penney Home Store for only $20! It was originally $120. I love those kinds of deals. As you can see they coordinate perfectly!

IMG_8742 IMG_8741 IMG_8745 IMG_8751I love how this project turned out but I love the final price tag even more! I spent $35 on the entire project! $25 of that was on a gift card so my final out-of-pocket cost was only $10!

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4 thoughts on “DIY Mosaic Resin Lamp

  1. Pingback: Decorating on a Budget | DownShannonLane

  2. Pingback: How to Tile the Top of a Small Dresser | DownShannonLane

  3. Pingback: DIY Paint Swatch Chandelier (Project Re-Do) | DownShannonLane

  4. Pingback: DIY Lamp Re-Haul | DownShannonLane

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